IMPACT for Administrators

Dealing with the change that the IMPACT model will bring

" "

  • "CHANGE:
    • • is a PROCESS, not an event
    • • is made by INDIVIDUALS first,then institutions
    • • is a highly PERSONAL experience
    • • entails DEVELOPMENTAL growth in feelings and skills
  •  
  • (Hord, 1998.")
"The conviction that the learning goals should be fixed and time a flexible resource opens up profound opportunities for change."

Using the Concerns-based Adoption Model (CBAM) to Move Teachers Forward in the IMPACT Model

In order for the IMPACT Model to work in a school, it must have the support and understanding of classroom teachers. Teachers must understand the changes that will occur in their classrooms and in their teaching as a result of this model. The administrative and media and technology staff must support and nurture teachers through this change.

Supporting and nurturing means addressing teachers as individuals and understanding their concerns about the changes they are or will be experiencing. According to the CBAM model of change, individuals involved in change can be identified as one of the following:

It is important to recognize that these identifiers are not meant to be negative or positive, but rather they allow a change facilitator to recognize what is needed to move an individual through the change process. For the IMPACT Model, this means being able to recognize how a teacher approaches a change to classroom practice and working with each individual to better utilize the model.

Once the school library media coordinator, technology facilitator, and/or administrator have identified each teacher’s adopter level, they should identify Stages of Concern.  The Stages of Concern help to identify how a person feels and thinks about a given initiative. In the implementation of the IMPACT Model, teachers will move through the stages as they become more comfortable with the collaborative process and the IMPACT culture.

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STAGES OF CONCERN

  1. AWARENESS: The individual either isn’t aware of the change being proposed or doesn’t want to learn it.
  2. INFORMATIONAL: The individual has heard of the program, but needs more information.
  3. PERSONAL: The individual’s main concern is how this program will affect them on a personal level.
  4. MANAGEMENT: The individual’s main concern is about the management, scheduling, etc., of a specific program.
  5. CONSEQUENCE: The individual’s primary concern is how the program will affect students or how they can make the program work for their students.
  6. COLLABORATION: The individual’s primary concern is how to make the program work better by actively working on it with colleagues.
  7. REFOCUSING: The individual’s primary concern is seeking out a new and better change to implement.

When the media coordinator, technology facilitator, and/or administrator have identified each teacher’s Stage of Concern, they can more easily communicate the needs of both the teacher and the program. Teachers in the early stages of concern will need more one-on-one assistance and encouragement than those in the later stages.

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WHAT TEACHERS MUST BE WILLING TO DO

When teachers understand that a change will take place, they will need to be completely aware of what implementing the IMPACT Model will mean to their classroom and their teaching practice.

TEACHERS MUST BE WILLING TO:

BE FLEXIBLE

ASSESS STUDENT NEEDS

INITIATE COLLABORATION

FAIL

ASK FOR HELP

CELEBRATE SUCCESSES

CHANGE ROLES

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